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REGISTRATION & VOTING
REVISED 1/17/2012
CONTENTS
The Board’s Role……………………..…………… …………….3
Borough Office Addresses & Phone Numbers……………………4
Registering to Vote……………………………………………….5-6
Party Affiliation/Voting in Primary Elections……………………6-7
Keeping your Registration Current……………………………….7-8
Absentee Voting………………………………………………….8-9
Where to Vote…………………………………………………….9-10
Voter's Guide to New York City Elections………………….……10-11
The Difference between Elections
Proposals/Referendum……………………………………………11
Voting on Election Day…………………………………………..12-14
Frequently Asked Questions……………………………….……..14-19

 

BOARD’S ROLE
The Board of Elections in the City of New York is an administrative body composed of ten Commissioners, two from each borough recommended by the two major parties and then appointed by the City Council for a term of four years. The Commissioners appoint a bipartisan staff to oversee the daily activities of its Executive and five borough offices. The Board is responsible under New York State Election Law for the following within the City of New York:
 Processing voter registration applications
 Maintaining and updating voter registration records
 Processing and verifying candidate petitions/documents
 Filing selected Campaign Finance Disclosure statements of candidates and campaign committees
 Recruiting, training and assigning poll workers to conduct elections
 Operating poll site locations
 Ensuring each voter their right to vote at the polls or by permitted absentee ballot
 Canvassing and certifying the votes cast at each election
 Conducting voter education outreach by distributing election information
 Preparing maps of various political subdivisions

Board Of Elections Office Addresses and Phone Numbers

QUEENS
200 Varick Street, 10th Floor 126-06 Queens Boulevard
New York, New York 10014 Kew Gardens, Queens 11415
(212) 886-2100 (718) 730-6730

STATEN ISLAND
1780 Grand Concourse 1 Edge water Plaza, 4th Floor
Bronx, New York 10457 Staten Island, New York 10305
(718) 299-9017 (718) 876-0079

BROOKLYN PHONE BANK
345 Adams Street, 4th Floor 1-212-VOTE-NYC (868-3692)
Brooklyn, New York 11201 1-866-VOTE-NYC
(718) 797-8800 TDD 212-487-5496

OFFICE
32 Broadway, 7th floor
New York, New York 10004
(212) 487-5300

PHONE BANK
The Phone Bank is linked to a caller distribution system which enables Board personnel to handle up to 70 calls at a time. The Phone Bank operates Monday through Friday from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Callers can obtain information regarding: poll sites; voter status; registration deadlines; and instructions on how to use voting equipment. They may also request: voter registration, absentee ballot and poll worker application forms and instructions on how to use the voting equipment. The hours are expanded during peak election periods. The Phone Bank has an “IVR (Integrated Voice Response)”system that allows us to give 24 hour service to the public. The system features multi-language recordings in English, Spanish, Chinese and Korean. Outside the regular hours of operation, the “automated operator” records names and addresses of callers requesting applications.
* Additional language may be included in the future as a result of the 2010 Census.

INTERNET
The Board of Elections in the City of New York’s website is updated and provides: Election Dates, information on how to obtain a voter registration application, a printable voter registration application, which can be filled out and mailed to the Board of Elections; the locations and telephone numbers of the offices of the Boards of Elections in the five Boroughs; a poll site locator and sample ballots for each election. Maps of political subdivisions and transportation maps for Election Day poll sites; our website address is http://vote.nyc.ny.us

REGISTERING TO VOTE

Qualifications
To register to vote in the City of New York, you must:
1. Be a citizen of the United States (includes persons born in Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands)
2. Live at you present address for at least 30 days before an Election. (Note: residence is not unintentionally lost /gained if you are serving in the armed forces or enrolled as a student at an institution of learning.)
3. Be 18 years of age by December 31st on the year in which you filed this registration. (Note: You must be at least 18 years old by the date of the General, Primary, or other Election in which you want to vote.)
4. Not be incarcerated for a felony conviction, or on parole for a felony conviction
5. Not be adjudged mentally incompetent by a court
6. Not claim the right to vote elsewhere (outside the City of New York)

Although can register any time during the year, your application must be delivered or postmarked at least 25 days before the next election for it to be effective for that election.

In the case of a special election a voter’s application must be delivered or post marked at least 10 days before the Special Election Day. (The voter must live in the Special Election District).

How To Register –Registration form – English
To register to vote, you must fill out in blue or black ink a voter registration application and send it to the Board of Elections or personally deliver it to one of our offices. The registration application must have the original signature on it. It cannot be faxed.

In 2002, the United States Government enacted into law the “Help America Vote Act”, (HAVA) which requires that any first time voter registering must provide some additional identification. The law requires that the voter provide his/her Driver’s License or Non-Driver ID number, the last four digits of his/her Social Security Number, or a bank statement, utility bill, etc. This only pertains to new voters who are registering for the first time as of 2003.

The Voter Registration Application has been changed to request this identification information.
If, however, these forms of identification are not provided when a person registers to vote the Board will send a letter to the first time voter asking the voter to provide forms of required identification information.
If you would like an application mailed to you, call the Board at 212-VOTE-NYC (868-3692) or 1-866-VOTE-NYC. Applications are also available at all Department of Motor Vehicle offices, public libraries, post offices and many other government agencies.

Voter registration in New York City is permanent. However, to assure that your registration remains valid you must notify the Board of Elections in the City of New York of your new address whenever you move, or if you change your name. This can be accomplished by completing a new voter registration form with updated information and returning it to Board of Elections in the City of New York.

PARTY AFFILIATION                                                                                                                        

Party Affiliation in New York State:

The voter registration application contains a section where you can indicate your choice for party affiliation. If you would like to register without designating a party, simply mark the space indicating “I do not wish to enroll in a party.”
The new registration applications list the Parties with ballot status, which as of 2010 are:
 Democratic
 Republican
 Conservative
 Working Families
 Independence
 Green
 Other__________
 I do not wish to enroll in a party
Any other group may be written in under other (write in) and we will enter up to the first 15 characters of that name into the registration system.

Generally, a person who chooses “other” or “I do not wish to enroll in a party” cannot vote in a primary election.

Party Affiliation and the Primary System
In most party primary elections, only voters enrolled in one of the parties qualified to hold a primary in New York City may vote to nominate their party’s candidates to run in the general election.
Candidates nominated by the parties for each office then appear on the general election ballot, along with any independent candidates who successfully petitions to gain access to the general election ballot without running in a party primary.
Voting in Party Primary Elections
Because a primary is strictly a party election, only voters enrolled in one of the parties conducting a primary may participate in that party’s election, unless a party’s rules

otherwise provides. All registered voters are eligible to vote in General and Special Elections.

To Change Your Party Affiliation
You can change your party affiliation by indicating the change on the voter registration application and sending it to the Board of Elections in the City of New York. We will process the change and send you a new voter card reflecting the change in party. You can change your enrollment; however, you will not be able to vote in a primary in the NEW PARTY of your choice in the same year.
Please note: A change of enrollment will go into affect one week AFTER the next November general election. The last day to change your enrollment is the same as the last day to register for the general election. (25 days prior to the general election).
KEEPING YOUR REGISTRATION CURRENT

 

What the Law Says

Your residence address determines the particular contests in which you are eligible to vote. Because of the role that addresses play in the electoral system, New York State law requires voters to notify the Board of Elections within 25 days of an address change to preserve their voting rights.

To Make Changes to Your Registration

You must notify the Board of Elections in the City of New York, in writing, to make any change to your registration. You may make the change on a voter registration application and send the completed voter registration application to the Board of Elections in the City of New York.

Controls for Keeping the Registry Current

The Board of Elections in the City of New York has procedures to keep the list of registered voters current. In conjunction with NCOA (National Change of Address) System, the Board of Elections matches its list of registered voters to a United States Postal Service list of person who have moved. This program is run periodically by the Board of Elections in the City of New York. This data, which is provided by the United States Postal Service, indicates to the Board, those registered voters who have moved within the state or out of the state. To those voters, the Board will send a Confirmation Notice to verify whether or not the voter has moved and update the list accordingly.
In August of every year, an Information Notice is mailed to every active registered voter in New York City giving him/her the dates of the upcoming elections, their ED/AD, poll site, election hours, etc. Those persons whose notice is returned to the Board of Elections in the City of New York as undeliverable, are then sent a Confirmation Notice so they can verify either

a) That they have moved; or
b) Sign an affidavit stating that they did not move.
If they have moved within the New York City, they must notify the Board of Elections in the City of New York. They can fill out a voter registration application and indicate that this is a change of address.

ABSENTEE VOTING

Absentee voting is available for:
 Registered voters who cannot make it to their poll site on Election Day because they will be outside the City of New York on Election Day (i.e. Primary/General/Special).
 If you are awaiting sentencing, or incarcerated for a misdemeanor charge you may vote by absentee ballot. However, if you have been convicted of a felony, you lose your right to vote.
 If you are ill, disabled, or in a hospital or long-term care facility, you may vote by absentee ballot.
There are two options for New York City voters wishing to cast an absentee ballot.
1. Vote in person at your Board’s Borough office, prior to Election Day.
2. Vote by mail.
In-Person Absentee Voting

In-person absentee voting begins as soon as the absentee ballots have been certified and are sent to the Borough Office. Absentee voting in person ends the day before Election Day.
In-person absentee voting is conducted during the above period, at the Board of Elections’ Borough Offices. The hours are 9:00 A.M. to 5.00 P.M. Monday through Friday and on the weekend prior to Election Day.
Check the Board of Elections in the City of New York’s website for a list of dates pertaining to each election.

By-Mail Absentee Voting

Requests for an absentee ballot sent by mail must be in writing and must reach the New York City Board’s office no later than the seventh day before an election. Absentee ballot applications can be obtained from the Board of Elections in the City of New York.
The absentee ballot application must include the following information:

 Name
 Address on voter registration application
 Mailing address (if different)
 Reason for requesting absentee ballot application
 The Type of Election ( Primary, General, Special ) and the date of the Election
 Signature

To be counted, the voted absentee ballot (and completed application form) must be postmarked by the day before Election Day and must reach the Board of Elections in the City of New York no later than seven (7) days after the election.

Using an Absentee Ballot

 

When you receive an absentee ballot read the directions that are printed on it. You will note that the correct way to mark your ballot is to fill in the ovals above or next to your choices. Do not write or make any other marks on the ballot. The only time you may write on the ballot is when you want to vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, then you may write his/her name in the write-in box and fill in the oval in that box. If there are ballot questions to be voted on, you will find them on the back of the ballot. Mark your vote by filling in the oval above or next to either “yes” or “no”. The paper ballots are canvassed by scanning them with machines so be sure to follow the directions and mark them correctly.
After marking your votes on the ballot by filling in the ovals next to your choices, fold the ballot and put it in the smaller envelope. Sign and date the back of that envelope. Seal the envelope and put it in the larger envelope that is addressed to the Board of Elections in the City of New York. Mail with sufficient postage or deliver your ballot following the regulations described in the other sections above.

WHERE TO VOTE

Poll sites are located throughout the city. You can vote ONLY at your designated poll site. Make sure you are at the correct poll site and Election District/Assembly District (ED/AD) for your address.
Poll sites are open for voting from, 6:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.

You can find your poll site location by:

 Searching the Online Poll Site Address locator at website: www.vote.nyc.ny.us
 Call the Voter Phone Bank at 1.866.VOTE.NYC
E-mail your complete home address to us at vote@boe.nyc.ny.us and we’ll e-email your polling place location back to you. (Please put in the subject line the borough in which you reside).

Making the Poll Sites Accessible

The Board has made a concerted effort to increase accessibility at poll sites for senior citizens and voters with disabilities by removing physical barriers at most New York City poll sites.

The effort includes:
 Construction of building ramps or installing temporary ramps for voters with mobility issues;
 Miscellaneous repairs to doors, handrails, light fixtures, and walkways
In some cases, poll sites have been relocated to more accessible buildings. If a poll site has been deemed inaccessible to the voter, a letter is sent to all voters using the particular site. The content of the letter will tell the voter to contact their borough office and request that their voting records be relocated to the accessible poll site with same ballot. The voter can also chose to continue to vote at the site or vote by absentee ballot. By January 2013, all poll sites must be fully accessible.

TDD Service

A Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) has been installed in the phone bank to answer inquires of any voter with a hearing impairment who has access to a TDD. The TDD Service Number is 212-487-5496.

Permanent Absentee Ballot
Any voter who is home bound or a resident of a long-term care facility can apply in writing to receive an absentee ballot permanently at a designated address. A ballot will automatically be mailed for each election to the voter. The ballot should be postmarked by the day before the election and must reach the Board of Elections no later than seven (7) days after the election.

VOTERS’ GUIDE TO NEW YORK CITY ELECTIONS

 

The Elections for the Following Public Office May Appear on New York City Ballots

 Electors for President and Vice President of the United States
 United States Senator
 Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
 Governor of New York State
 Lieutenant Governor of New York State
 State Attorney General
 State Comptroller
 N.Y. State Senator
 N.Y. State Assembly Member
 N.Y.C. Mayor
 N.Y.C. Public Advocate
 N.Y.C. City Comptroller
 Borough President
 N.Y.C. Council Member
 District Attorney
 Surrogate Judge
 State Supreme Court Justice
 N.Y.C. Civil Court Judge
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ELECTIONS/PROPOSALS/REFERENDUM

Election Schedule

Primaries for party nominations of elected offices are currently scheduled in September, with the General Election in November. In Presidential election years, a Presidential Primary Election is held early in the year. All pertinent information to all elections is located on the Board of Elections in the City of New York web site www.vote.nyc.ny.us

Primary, Special, General Election

A Primary Election is held to permit enrolled voters in a qualified political party to select their party’s nominees to the general election for public offices and actually elect party officers. Because a primary is a party election usually voters registered in one of the parties qualified to conduct a primary in New York City may vote in their party’s primary, unless otherwise permitted by a party’s rule. A Special Election is held when a specified Public Office is vacated prior to the expiration of the term of position.
 The Governor of the State of New York issues a proclamation declaring a Special Election to fill a vacated office of Member of Congress, New York State Senator and New York State Assembly Member.
 The Mayor of the City of New York issues a proclamation declaring a Special Election to fill a vacated City office of Mayor, Comptroller, Public Advocate, Borough President or Member of The New York City Council
A General Election is held to elect candidates to public offices. Nominees selected in the party primary elections appear on the ballot, along with independent candidates.
No party affiliation is necessary to vote in a Special or General Election
Proposals Ballot Questions and Referendum Measures
The State Legislature, the Mayor, and/or City Council are required to place certain Proposals, Questions and Amendments on the ballot for New York City voters to adopt a change in the State Constitution, New York City Charter, or approve the expenditure of certain funds. In addition, amendments to the city charter can be placed on the ballot if it meets the legal requirements and if proponents show public support by collecting signatures of at least (5%) percent of the city’s registered voters.

VOTING ON ELECTION DAY

Step 1 – “Where to Vote”
Make sure you are at the correct poll site and Election District (E.D.) for your address.
Poll sites are open from 6:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.
On the website click locate & confirm your polling site- Poll Site locator,
www.vote.nyc.ny.us

Step 2 – “Be an Informed Voter” at the poll site.
Remember to look at the sample ballot and voting instructions at each poll site on the wall before you get on line.
A sample ballot is on the Board on Elections in the City of New York website at http://vote.nyc.ny.us/

Step 3 – “Signing-In”
To vote, you must go to your assigned Election District poll site which is indicated on your voter registration card or the Annual Information Notice (this notice is sent out to all active registered voters in August of each year) or ask any election official at the poll site to look up your address in the street locator to insure that you are at the right poll site and Election District.

Step 4 – “If You Need Assistance”
You may be assisted in making and casting you ballot by any person of your choice including a bipartisan team of trained poll workers, except your employer or union representative. At selected sites pursuant to Federal Law, Board interpreters are also available to assist voters.

Step 5 – Marking & Casting You Ballot

Instructional Video

 Go to the Board of Elections in the City of New York website www.vote.nyc.ny.us
 Go to the upper right hand side of the webpage and click Mark it, Scan it, Vote the new way

Description of instructions that are on the Instructional Video

1. GET YOUR BALLOT

 Go to your designated poll site, sign in and get your paper ballot and privacy sleeve from the poll worker
 A privacy sleeve will be provided to shield your ballot from view after you have marked it
 Go to the privacy booth

2. MARK YOUR BALLOT

 Mark your ballot by completely darkening the oval in the box next to or above your choice using the pen provided
 Do Not use and “X” or a “”
 Do Not circle the oval or make stray marks on the ballot
 For a write-in candidate, fill in the appropriate oval and write in the candidate’s name
 Ballot Marking Devices (BMDs) are available for voters who need assistance or would like to enlarge the print on there ballot

3. SCAN YOUR BALLOT

 Take your ballot to the ballot scanner
 Do not fold your ballot before inserting it into the scanner
Insert your marked ballot into the scanner to cast your vote

Step 6 -Voting by Emergency Ballot

 If the scanner for your poll site is not operating, you will be given your paper ballot. The poll workers will canvass the emergency ballots when the polls are closed at the end of the day in accordance with State Law
 Take the envelope and the ballot to the privacy booth
 Mark your votes with a pen with blue or black ink
 The way to vote is to fill in the ovals next to or above to your choices. Remember not to use any other markings on the ballot
 Place your ballot in the Emergency Slot on the Scanner
 If your name does not appear on the list of registered voters or if your signature is missing from that list, you will be given an affidavit ballot and an envelope in which to seal it in. At the close of the polls, the sealed envelopes are brought back to the Board of Elections in the City of New York borough offices where your registration will be verified by a bipartisan team before your ballot is canvassed.
 Take the envelope and ballot that the poll worker gives you and take it to the privacy booth
 Complete the envelope. Make sure you fully complete parts A, B, C and D if applicable
 Mark your votes on the ballot with a pen with blue or black ink
 The way to vote is to fill in the ovals next to or above your choices. Remember not to make any other markings on the ballot
 Put the ballot in the envelope
 Seal the envelope and give it to the poll worker
 You are finished
 If you are required by the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) to show identification before you can vote on the scanner and you cannot or choose not to comply, then you will be given an affidavit ballot and an envelope in which to seal it in. At the close of the polls, the sealed envelopes are brought back to the Board of Elections in the City of New York borough offices where your registration will be verified by a bipartisan team before your ballot is canvassed.
 Take the envelope and ballot that the poll worker gives you to the privacy booth
 Complete the envelope by filling out Part A, B, C and if applicable D
 Mark your votes on the ballot with a pen with blue or black ink
 The way to vote is to fill in the ovals next to or above your choices. Remember not to make any other markings on the ballot
 Put ballot it in the envelope
 Seal the envelope and give it to the poll worker
 You are finished

Frequently Asked Questions

Voter Guide

A “Voter” Guide for both the Primary and General Election for municipal elections only, is produced by the NYC Campaign Finance Board. The guide will be sent to every household in New York City with a registered voter. They will be mailed prior to the Primary Election. If you do not receive one, call the New York City Campaign Finance Board at 212-306-7100. Also look for candidate forums and debates within your community, along with profiles in the news media for other federal and state contests.
"Who Can Vote?"

 Be a United State Citizen
 Be 18 years old by December 31st of the year in which you file this form. (Note you must be 18 years old by the date of the General, Primary or other Election in which you want to vote.)
NOTE: The registration form on this website is ONLY for residents of New York City (Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx and Staten Island). Be sure to complete and return your registration application before the deadline.

"Where Can I Get A Mail Registration Application?"

E-mail your mailing address to vote@boe.nyc.ny.us (please put in the subject line the borough in which you reside) or call toll-free 1-866-VOTE-NYC (If out of New York City, call (212)-VOTE-NYC (868-3692) and ask to have an application sent to you. You may also pick one up at your local post office, library or motor vehicle office. Visit our registration page for more information. You can download the form and send it back to us postage paid. http://vote.nyc.ny.us/pdf/forms/boe/voterreg/voterregenglish.pdf
"Can I Register In Person?"

Yes. Many public agencies are now providing voter registration forms and assistance. You can also register at any one of the borough Board of Elections offices Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. If you don't get a registration card within 4 to 6 weeks of completing your application, you might want to call the Board of Elections in the City of New York Phone Bank toll-free at 1-866-VOTE-NYC or (212)-VOTE-NYC if out of New York City, to see if your application was processed.

“If I Am A Student In New York City And Have A Residence In Another State, How Can I Vote In An Election?

If you are a student in New York City, but have a residence in another state and wish to register in New York, you must fill out a registration form indicating your New York City residency. That registration will be treated as any other registration. The new registration will cancel out the registration in the other state.

"Do I Have To Register Every Year?"

No. Once you register, you are permanently registered unless:
 You are purged from the system (A voter in inactive status who dose not vote in two consecutive Federal Elections is in the fifth year, removed from the list of register. The voter must re-register in order to vote.)
 Convicted of a Felony.
 Adjudged mentally incompetent by a court.
 See page 5.
Name, address or party enrollment changes can be made by submitting a new registration application. If you move, you should notify the Board of Elections in the City of New York as soon as possible, by re-registering. The Board of Elections in the City of New York will transfer the registration and enrollment of any voter for whom it receives a notice of change of address to another address in New York City, or for any voter who casts a ballot in an affidavit ballot envelope which sets forth the new address, process change of enrollment form invalid affidavit ballot envelope. If the Board of Elections in the City of New York receives notice at least twenty days before a Primary, Special or General election, it must complete the change of address before the election.

"How Will I Know Where To Vote?"

You should receive a notice from the Board of Elections in the City of New York some time in August, telling you where to vote. It will also indicate your Election District / Assembly District number which you need to know on Election Day. Or, you can e-mail your complete home address to vote@boe.nyc.ny.us (please put in the subject line the borough in which you reside).

Click here to use The Online Poll Site Address Locator

http://gis.nyc.gov/vote/ps/index.htm

"How Do Candidates Get On The Ballot?"

In New York State, most candidates get on the ballot by filing a petition containing a specified number of signatures. The required amount varies, depending on the office sought and whether the candidate is seeking a party nomination or a spot on the ballot as an independent. Some candidates are nominated by political committees and conventions.
"Who Can Sign A Petition?"
Only enrolled party members living within the appropriate district may sign petitions for candidates who seek their party's nomination. However, any registered voter living within the appropriate district may sign a petition for a candidate seeking to run as an independent in the general election as long as s/he has not already signed on behalf of another candidate.

"Should I Be Concerned About Signing A Petition?"

Absolutely not! Signing a petition is an important way to participate in the electoral process.

"What Is A Primary Election?"

A primary is an election that may take place within each of New York State's official political parties. It precedes the general election and provides enrolled political party members the opportunity to nominate their party's candidates for elected office as well as to elect various party officials. However, if there is no contest, there is no primary.

"Why Should I Enroll In A Political Party?"

Enrolled party members who help nominate candidates by signing petitions and voting in the primary have greater political clout than non-enrolled voters who can vote only in the general election. Moreover, you are not obligated to vote for your party's candidate in the general election. In November, you may vote for any candidate from any party.

"How Do I Enroll In A Political Party?"

You voluntarily enroll in any party by indicating your preference on the voter registration form either at the same time that you register to vote or by re-registering or if you have indicated such a change on an Invalid Affidavit Ballot
"What Happens If I Can't Vote On Election Day?"

If you will be out of town on Primary, General, Special Election day or are physically unable to go to the polls, you can vote by absentee ballot. http://vote.nyc.ny.us/pdf/forms/boe/absenteevoting/absenglish.pdf
"How Can I Get An Absentee Ballot?"

Absentee ballot applications can be obtained by writing the Board of Elections, calling toll-free 1-866-VOTE-NYC or (212) VOTE-NYC, e-mailing your request to vote@boe.nyc.ny.us (please put in the subject line the borough in which you reside) or visit our absentee page. You can download this form from our website at http://vote.nyc.ny.us/pdf/forms/boe/absenteevoting/absenglish.pdf

"How Do I Mark A Paper Ballot"

Be sure to follow the directions that are printed on a paper ballot. Paper ballots are canvassed by scanning them with machines therefore you must mark them correctly for your vote to count. Just fill in the oval next to or above your choice. Fill in the ovals with a pen with blue or black ink. Do not make any marks anywhere on the ballot, if you want to vote for someone whose name does not appear on the ballot you may write his or her name in the write-in box and fill in the oval on that write-in box. If there are propositions up for vote, you will find them on the back of the ballot. Mark your vote by filling in the oval next to either "yes" or "no".
"I'm Disabled. Where Can I Vote?"

Almost all poll sites are now accessible to the handicapped. All will be by January 1, 2013. If yours is not, you may ask to have your records transferred to a nearby accessible poll site where the ballot will be the same as in your election district. You may also vote by absentee ballot. If you have a long-term or permanent illness or disability, you can apply for a permanent absentee ballot and you will automatically receive one before each primary, special and general election. Click Here for information.

"What Do I Need When I Go To Vote?"

The "Help America Vote Act" (HAVA) which was enacted into law in 2002, requires all first time voters to provide additional identification either on or with the voter registration application, i.e., the driver's license number, non- driver’s ID number or the last four digits of your social security number. If you do not provide your driver’s license number or the last four digits of your social security number at the time you submit your registration form by mail, you can include a copy of any of the following documentation with your registration application: Current and Valid Photo ID; Current Utility Bill; Bank Statement; Government Check or Paycheck; Government Document that shows Name and Address. If the voter has not provided any of the acceptable forms of identification by the time they vote in an Election, the voter will not be allowed to vote on the poll site scanner, but will be able to vote by affidavit ballot. The voter will not be denied the right to vote.

"What Do I Do When I Get To The Poll Site?"

When you enter poll site, you'll see tables for one or more election districts (E.D.). At the table for your E.D. you will be asked to sign above to a facsimile of your original signature on an alphabetical computerized poll-list. You will than be given a paper ballot and be directed to a privacy booth mark you ballot and take it to the scanner.

"What If I'm Not Permitted To Vote?"

If you are not on the poll-list, ask the inspector to verify that you are at the proper table for your address. Make sure that it is your correct Election and Assembly District. It may be because your registration form was not received by the deadline or, for a primary, because you aren't enrolled in a party. If you believe that you are eligible, you can still vote. Ask for an affidavit ballot. After the election, the Board of Elections in the City of New York will check its records and your vote will be counted if you are indeed eligible to vote and are at the correct poll site. If not, you will receive a notice that you are not eligible, along with a registration application for future elections.
"How Does the Scanner Work?"

http://www.votethenewwayny.com/en/default.aspx

INSTRUCTION PERTAINING TO SCANNING MACHINE

 Take your ballot to the scanning area
 Select the language of your choice
 Insert ballot

INSTRUCTION PERTAINING TO BMD- BALLOT MARKING DEVICE

Video on BMD
 The BMD provides two ways for voters to access the ballot:
o See the ballot on the screen
o Listen to the ballot through audio headphones
 Touch screen
 Key paid ( Braille )
 Sip & Puff Device
 Rocker Paddle
After completing your ballot, review you selection. To change a selection, select contest or issues you would like to change and reselect the proper choice. Select “Next” to return to the summary screen
 When finished select “next” select “mark ballot” to print you mark ballot
 Take your printed ballot to the scanner area

"Suppose I Need Help?"

If you need some help because you are disabled or cannot read the ballot, federal law allows you to have a friend or relative assist you in the privacy booth. Election inspectors at the site are also ready to help you.

To"If I Register Vote, Will I Be Called For Jury Duty?"

Jurors are drawn from lists of state taxpayers and licensed drivers as well as from voter registration rolls. Do not give up your right to vote in the hope that you will avoid jury duty. Chances are, if you pay taxes or drive a car, you will still be called. Besides, serving on a jury is a privilege, one that permits you to personally stand up for all Americans' right to a trial by a jury of their peers.

"Can A Felony Conviction Affect My Right To Vote?"
You may not register or vote, if you have been convicted of a felony and for that felony:
– You are currently incarcerated; or
– You are under parole supervision.
You may register and vote if you were convicted of a felony and for that felony:
– You were sentenced to probation;
– You were not sentenced to incarceration or your prison sentence was suspended;
– You have served your maximum prison sentence; in which case you are able to re-register to vote
– You were on parole and then discharged, in which case you are able to re-register to vote
– You have received a pardon
“Can A Misdemeanor Conviction Affect My Right to Vote?”

You may register and vote, even from jail, if you have been convicted of only a misdemeanor.
The same rules apply whether you were convicted in a New York court, another state’s court or a federal court.
You do not need to provide any documentation about your criminal record in order to register and vote

 

 

 

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